Oh, Wales…

Let’s talk Wales then. If we’re all honest, most of use aren’t quite sure what Wales really is. Sure, it’s part of the United Kingdom but is it a country, a state or a province? It is a country and a quite underrated one. Before coming to Wales to study my Master’s degree in Cardiff, I didn’t know a lot about Wales. Pictures of green hills, sheep and rain came to my mind. Mostly empty, untouched land. I knew about Snowdonia, its famous national park and I knew that Cardiff was its capital city. But I didn’t really know what I was in for coming to this place.

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Yes, Wales is all about charming. A lush countryside, enchanting forests and tiny cottages hidden away between the trees. But Wales is so much more. During my time here I was lucky to getting the opportunity to discover its beauty and fall in love with it. Did you ever think of visiting Wales? Probably not. I guess Wales is just not the typical travel destination that makes the top of our bucket lists. If you’re from Europe, it’s not far away enough to ignite your wanderlust and it probably doesn’t even have a strong destination brand for you. There’s no strong image that comes to your mind when you think about Wales and its culture is not pulling you in with an infinite force.

Recently, someone told me that Wales is a bit like the European version of New Zealand – just as enchanting and jaw-drapping but a smaller, more accessible version. And let me tell you, this someone had been to both countries. So why not pack your bags and jump on a plane for two hours instead of travelling around the world? Yes, I am an explorer that goes far and wide and urges to discover every corner of the world but sometimes it’s worth just stopping yourself and exploring what’s close to you. Be it the country you grew up in or a place that’s around the corner from where you are now.

9 thoughts on “Oh, Wales…

  1. Very interesting! How do the people from Wales see themselves? Do they consider themselves British or do they have a separate identity?

    • Well, they have a very strong and unique culture – every street sign is in Welsh and English and they do celebrate their uniqueness whenever they can. Never identify someone from Wales as being “English”, they are very particular about their identity. But they definitely see themselves and part of Great Britain and the UK. It’s a fine line between emphasising Wales’ characteristics and still acknowledging that it is part of something bigger.

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